However, it works, and I've made it as fast as possible, just one extra server-round-trip per insert or update after the first.For the time being, only single-row LOB updates are supported. To insert or update a large LOB, DBD:: Oracle has to know in advance that it is a LOB type.

updating table in dbi perl-39updating table in dbi perl-25

Ok, I have the DBI book, and im fairly familiar with it for all the basic stuff. the filename you can easily represent using VARCHAR.

See - you will need that image on the disk anyway, and the time you'll spend on inserting and extracting the image from/to the table, is a waste.

When inserting or updating LOBs some major magic has to be performed behind the scenes to make it transparent.

Basically the driver has to refetch the newly inserted 'LOB Locators' before being able to write to them.

(Oh, im able to convert it, but with a hack i wrote, and id prefer to be more elegant with pack if i can) pack of the entire file never seems to work properly for me.

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

0[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]1[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]2[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]3[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]4execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

0[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]1[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]2[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]3[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]4execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

0[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]1[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]2[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]3[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]4execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

0[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]1[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]2[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]3[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]4execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

0[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]1[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]2[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]3[[

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give. Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

Aside from the DB connections (which you can simulate with your own connect, that script is pretty basic. The DBD file says two things: In comments it says v1.57 (top line) under version it says $DBD:: Oracle:: Version = '0.54'; Im guessing it might be sort of old. It looks pretty definite that my problems were based on DBI.

Here's a small script that shows you how to do both hex/base64. /usr/local2/bin/perl use MIME:: Base64; $use Base64=1; $bin="\000\001\002\003\004execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.

||

TIA Matt, while you don't have to encode the data to hex, you can of course do it. If you want to encode/decode the data I suggest Base64 encoding which gives you a better ratio between compressed/uncompressed data.

However, thoellri you did give me a lot of info, so i'm going to figure how many points to give.

Here's a "putting all the technology together" demonstration ...

In all cases where it can possibly work it out for itself, it does, however, if there are multiple LOB fields of the same type in the table then you need to tell it which field each LOB param relates to: $sth- Same answer.

]]4execute(); ------------ NOTES: You can ignore the use Oracle. Feel free to insert your own DB connectivity code). (Which seems to be a real insert, but when i use the code to get i get an invalid types error.