As support for Rosetta was dropped in OS X Lion, Snow Leopard is the last version of Mac OS X that is able to run Power PC-only applications.Snow Leopard was succeeded by Mac OS X Lion (version 10.7) on July 20, 2011.

Mac OS X Snow Leopard (version 10.6) is the seventh major release of Mac OS X (now named mac OS), Apple's desktop and server operating system for Macintosh computers.

Snow Leopard was publicly unveiled on June 8, 2009 at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference.

On August 28, 2009, it was released worldwide, and was made available for purchase from Apple's website and its retail stores at the price of US$29 for a single-user license.

As a result of the low price, initial sales of Snow Leopard were significantly higher than that of its predecessors.

Mac OS X Tiger added limited support for 64-bit applications on machines with 64-bit processors; Leopard extended the support for 64-bit applications to include applications using most of Mac OS X's libraries and frameworks.

In Snow Leopard, most built-in applications have been rebuilt to use the 64-bit x86-64 architecture (excluding i Tunes, Front Row, Grapher and DVD Player applications).

On the other hand, some Apple press materials appear to indicate that this version is, in fact, the "Single Use" license: However, even if the retail edition of Snow Leopard is in fact a "Leopard Upgrade", the company has acknowledged that there is no technical barrier in that edition preventing a direct upgrade from Mac OS X "Tiger".

and the installation discs provided through this program are clearly marked as upgrades unlike either of the retail editions.

Addition of new end-user features was not a primary consideration: its name signified its goal to be a refinement of the previous OS X version, Leopard.