When asked why I still believe in it by friends, I have a wide selection of examples to draw from – and I’ve shared them with you all too.

But recently I got back “on the market,” and reentered this crazy/fun/slightly-exhausting world again.

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You swipe/click/poke/prod – they reciprocate, and then when it comes time to meet up, (s)he drops the bomb that they had no intention of actually meeting up – that “online dating is for losers and my BFF [presumably Jill] made me this profile for me as a joke.” Ways to avoid: Look out for too-much focus on “online” – if they keep harping on it, then it’s likely they have some self-security issues.

The irony of this type of flake is that they often claim that online dating is only for losers/weirdos – but then what does that make them – who claim to not be looking for something, but instead troll online dating sites for someone to talk to.

There are many of us on here who are seeking something more than a hookup, an arm accessory, or expensed meal (on the ‘corporate account’ of the dude’s bank account).

There are many people who put themselves out there emotionally through online dating – and if you keep burning them, well, they will eventually become jaded.

As I detailed in an earlier post, the most common lies told by online daters concern age and physical appearance. There is, surprisingly, still some stigma attached to online dating, despite its general popularity.

Gross misrepresentations about education or relationship status are rare, in part because people realize that once they meet someone in person and begin to develop a relationship, serious lies are highly likely to be revealed. Many people continue to see it as a last refuge for desperate people who can’t get a date “in real life." Many couples that meet online are aware of this stigma and, if they enter into a serious relationship, may create false cover stories about how they met. A common belief is that love found online can't last.The statistics behind the finding that the couples that met online were more likely to break up do hold up to scrutiny, but these results are certainly not the last word given the small sample of only 280 couples that met online, as compared to more than 6,000 in the study by Cacioppo and colleagues.So, the findings on longevity are somewhat mixed, with the larger study suggesting that online couples are better off.Researchers polled individuals currently involved in romantic relationships, 2,643 of whom met offline and 280 of whom met online.How can we reconcile these seemingly conflicting results?Since diving into the online dating world over five years ago, I’ve had my share of great experiences.