These dating methods rely on a series of assumptions about the amounts of the parent-daughter elements, and a constant rate of decay. It has been accepted that a rock is formed when it first cools down from a molten or semi-molten state, which may include a variety of elements, including radioactive ones. For the last 100 years we have been able to measure the decay rate, and during this time it has been very steady, very consistent.

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How do we know that there wasn’t lead in the rock when it was first formed?

What is the real initial percentages of the U parent and Pb (lead) daughter elements?

And the ages assigned to the layers were derived from long age evolutionary assumptions – not from the scientific facts, – as the column was established long before we even had radiometric dating.

Yet the column and its assumptions are used along with index fossils to assign dates to sedimentary rock layers and which in turn is used to date any fossil in that rock layer.

All the canyon layers are ocean bottom sediments, filled with fossils of ocean-dwelling creatures and plants almost a mile high from top to bottom.

The Cardenas Basalt bottom layer (below the Cambrian explosion) is usually dated with Rhobidium -Strontium and calculated to be about 1 billion years old.

The resulting rock strata may harbor fossils from a particular habitat area or ecosystem, but do not represent a particular age or era.

Why else do we find marine fossils on the tops of all the major mountain ranges?

Since the early 20th century, Radioisotope dating has been used to bolster the vast time spans ascribed to the geologic record.

However, research by geologist John Woodmorappe (a pen name) revealed that the radiometric methods used today were actually hand-picked to coincide with the dates previously assumed for the geologic column diagrams.

This is a real and common problem with radiometric dating techniques.