"In the process of going back and forth, a scammer is going to try to figure out what makes a person tick, what their vulnerable spots are," said Jenny Shearer, an FBI spokeswoman.

"Because a victim has legitimate feelings, they might be inclined to offer financial support for this person." For Best, it all started when she signed up for a free online dating site called mingle2.

The Express noted that nearly a dozen officers were present at the California courtroom in order to maintain order in case protesters or supporters of Chapman wanted to cause a disruption.

You can connect with Facebook so getting started is much quicker than with other sites.

A one step Facebook log-in process leads on to a few simple questions (the most obvious – height, kids, whether you drink or smoke), a description and a photo – then you are in.

In a typical con, the perpetrator will spend weeks or even months building up a romantic relationship with a victim through e-mails, texts or phone calls, before eventually asking for money.

And many of the scammers aren't even in the United States.

Error Banner.fade_out.modal_overlay.modal_overlay .modal_wrapper.modal_overlay [email protected](max-width:630px)@media(max-width:630px).modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:before.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:before.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:before.modal_overlay .modal_fixed_close:hover:before.

Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_input. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_spinner. At first, Best -- who juggles two part-time jobs working with developmentally-disabled adults and people with mental illness -- resisted, telling John she simply didn't have the money. "He was trying to get me to use my credit cards, borrow from my friends and family," said Best, who earlier told her saga to The Huffington Post.When he told her days later he couldn't afford to eat, Best gave in, wiring him two 0 payments. soldiers serving abroad, then ask for money to purchase laptops, international phones or a plane ticket home so their fake relationship can continue. Army's Criminal Investigation Command says they receive hundreds of reports every month from people fooled by phony service members.Then she received a nearly

Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_input. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_spinner. At first, Best -- who juggles two part-time jobs working with developmentally-disabled adults and people with mental illness -- resisted, telling John she simply didn't have the money. "He was trying to get me to use my credit cards, borrow from my friends and family," said Best, who earlier told her saga to The Huffington Post.When he told her days later he couldn't afford to eat, Best gave in, wiring him two $250 payments. soldiers serving abroad, then ask for money to purchase laptops, international phones or a plane ticket home so their fake relationship can continue. Army's Criminal Investigation Command says they receive hundreds of reports every month from people fooled by phony service members.Then she received a nearly $1,000 phone bill from calling the phone number he had said wouldn't charge her. number Best reached him at revealed the number was no longer in service and was hosted by Magic Jack, an Internet-based phone service that allows people anywhere in the world to make unlimited calls from a U. Shortly after the conversations, victims are provided links to a website where their names, photos and telephone numbers are posted, along with the option to view the sexual conversations for $9.CNNMoney's attempts to reach "John" on his international phone number provided by Best revealed that it was based out of Nigeria -- a hotbed for online scams -- and has since been disconnected. Victims are then prompted to pay $99 to have their name removed from the site.Be especially cautious with people you only know through online messages and phone calls. Many scammers use fake photos to lure their victims but video messaging is much harder to fake.

||

Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_input. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_spinner.

At first, Best -- who juggles two part-time jobs working with developmentally-disabled adults and people with mental illness -- resisted, telling John she simply didn't have the money. "He was trying to get me to use my credit cards, borrow from my friends and family," said Best, who earlier told her saga to The Huffington Post.

When he told her days later he couldn't afford to eat, Best gave in, wiring him two $250 payments. soldiers serving abroad, then ask for money to purchase laptops, international phones or a plane ticket home so their fake relationship can continue. Army's Criminal Investigation Command says they receive hundreds of reports every month from people fooled by phony service members.

Then she received a nearly $1,000 phone bill from calling the phone number he had said wouldn't charge her. number Best reached him at revealed the number was no longer in service and was hosted by Magic Jack, an Internet-based phone service that allows people anywhere in the world to make unlimited calls from a U. Shortly after the conversations, victims are provided links to a website where their names, photos and telephone numbers are posted, along with the option to view the sexual conversations for $9.

CNNMoney's attempts to reach "John" on his international phone number provided by Best revealed that it was based out of Nigeria -- a hotbed for online scams -- and has since been disconnected. Victims are then prompted to pay $99 to have their name removed from the site.

Be especially cautious with people you only know through online messages and phone calls. Many scammers use fake photos to lure their victims but video messaging is much harder to fake.

||

Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_input. Selector .selector_input_interaction .selector_spinner.

At first, Best -- who juggles two part-time jobs working with developmentally-disabled adults and people with mental illness -- resisted, telling John she simply didn't have the money. "He was trying to get me to use my credit cards, borrow from my friends and family," said Best, who earlier told her saga to The Huffington Post.

When he told her days later he couldn't afford to eat, Best gave in, wiring him two $250 payments. soldiers serving abroad, then ask for money to purchase laptops, international phones or a plane ticket home so their fake relationship can continue. Army's Criminal Investigation Command says they receive hundreds of reports every month from people fooled by phony service members.

Then she received a nearly $1,000 phone bill from calling the phone number he had said wouldn't charge her. number Best reached him at revealed the number was no longer in service and was hosted by Magic Jack, an Internet-based phone service that allows people anywhere in the world to make unlimited calls from a U. Shortly after the conversations, victims are provided links to a website where their names, photos and telephone numbers are posted, along with the option to view the sexual conversations for $9.

,000 phone bill from calling the phone number he had said wouldn't charge her. number Best reached him at revealed the number was no longer in service and was hosted by Magic Jack, an Internet-based phone service that allows people anywhere in the world to make unlimited calls from a U. Shortly after the conversations, victims are provided links to a website where their names, photos and telephone numbers are posted, along with the option to view the sexual conversations for .CNNMoney's attempts to reach "John" on his international phone number provided by Best revealed that it was based out of Nigeria -- a hotbed for online scams -- and has since been disconnected. Victims are then prompted to pay to have their name removed from the site.Be especially cautious with people you only know through online messages and phone calls. Many scammers use fake photos to lure their victims but video messaging is much harder to fake.