The site also provides fact sheets on the age of the Earth and isochron dating.

New data collected by secular researchers has confirmed what creation scientists discovered decades ago—geologists’ assumptions about radioactive decay are not always correct.

► The isochron results provide an absolute chronology framework for the sequence over the last 250 ka.

A prolific scientist and author, he has published dozens of papers elucidating the theory of evolution.

He is currently a professor emeritus at the University of Chicago in the Department of Ecology and Evolution. in biology from the College of William & Mary in 1971. in biology at Harvard University in 1978, studying under Richard Lewontin, and went on to do a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Davis with Timothy Prout.

The idea of radioactive decay and half lives, a type of absolute dating, is shown through an activity using M&M's candy and graph paper. Sequencing Time, University of California, Berkeley. This 5-12-grade activity lets students place parts of their own life story into a time line so that they can better understand how geologic time is reconstructed by scientists.

Who's on First, University of California, Berkeley. This website is a book chapter about geologic time. This online version of their informative booklet contains short, content explanations about relative time, major geologic time divisions, index fossils for use in age dating, radiometric dating and the age of the earth.

For a century, the radioactive decay of unstable elements into more stable ones has been used as a natural clock to estimate the age of earth materials.

Even the solar system has been dated using one of these systems, by measuring the amount of a decaying element and comparing it to the amount of its stable (decayed) daughter material in meteorites.

However, a recent analysis using state-of-the-art equipment found that a basic assumption underlying one of these clock systems needs to be re-evaluated.

Gregory Brennecka of Arizona State University and colleagues measured the relative amounts of Uranium 238 to Uranium 235 from several samples taken from the large Allende meteorite, named for the village in Mexico near where it landed in 1969.

In a article on Brennecka’s findings, Gerald Wasserburg, emeritus professor of geology at Caltech, commented, “Everybody was sitting on this two-legged stool claiming it was very stable, but it turns out it’s not.” To be fair, however, it wasn’t “everybody” who claimed this.