1150 - 1350 Large pueblos, cliff dwellings and towers are the rule. Red, orange and yellow pottery on the rise as black-on-white declines. D 1600 - present During the first part of this era the Spanish military, church and civil domination and rule of the pueblos drives the Pueblo religion underground. Pottery consists of corrugated gray and decorated black-on-white in addition to some decorated red and orange vessels.These animals, which were already tame around humans, could be taken and used as hunting companions, or livestock guardians and different dog types likely evolved from these proto-dogs, not wolves.

Rather, many of these domesticated dogs were given the same funerary rights as their owners.

then, may be a species that was the result of natural selection.

At the time of its greatest extent, the Anasazi culture was spread over most of New Mexico, northern Arizona, southwestern Colorado, and much of Utah.

This is a region comparable in size to modern France, but great uninhabited stretches lay between the villages, which were located where water was available.

built the numerous communal dwellings, or pueblos, many now in ruins, on the high plateau of the southwestern United States.

The oldest remains are in the Four Corners region, where Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah adjoin.

Many villages across the world are home to dogs that live as scavengers and who are not intentionally cared for by humans.

The first primitive dogs were likely very similar to these scavenging village dogs.

Plain pottery and gray with neck bands predominate; there is some black-on-white and decorated redware. Small blocks of above-ground masonry rooms and a kiva make up a typical pueblo.