Mentioning your religion helps you, but, paradoxically, it helps you most if you have no religion.We know that’s going to piss a lot of people off, and we’re more or less tongue-in-cheek with this advice, but it’s what the numbers say.

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Our program looked at keywords and phrases, how they affected reply rates, and what trends were statistically significant.

The result: a set of rules for what you should and shouldn’t say when introducing yourself. Let’s go: Netspeak, bad grammar, and bad spelling are huge turn-offs.

Besides, when you tell a woman she’s beautiful, chances are you’re not.

On the other hand, more general compliments seem to work well: is almost always used to describe the way something or someone looks, and you can see how that works out. After all, the way you choose to start your initial message to someone is the “first impression of your first impression.” The results surprised us: perform better, bucking the general “be literate” rule.

In fact, it’s smarter to use no traditional salutation at all (which earns you the reply rate of 27%) and just dive into whatever you have to say than to start with all did very well.

Maybe they set a more casual tone that people prefer, though I have to say, You had me at ‘what’s up’ doesn’t quite have the same ring to it.

There are many words on the effective end of our list like (double yes!

) that are all clearly referencing something important to the sender, the recipient, or, ideally, both.

A very well-spoken and clearly an educated guy, he sent me a message detailing a situation with a girl he knew... The basic gist of today's post is, basically, that this -- what we're about to talk about -- is how you write online dating messages and emails that don't get ignored...

and, in fact, get you exactly what you want: responses, phone numbers, dates, and success.

In addition, our analysis program looked at messages only two or three words at a time, to track the success of certain words or phrases (like “what’s up” vs. The program then aggregated results by phrase before presenting the data.