Key risk factors consistently found in the literature to be associated with inflicting dating violence include the following: holding norms accepting or justifying the use of violence in dating relationships (Malik et al., 1997; O'Keefe, 1997); having friends in violent relationships (Arriaga & Foshee, 2004); exposure to violence in one's family and community violence (Foo & Margolin, 1995, O'Keefe, 1997; Schwartz et al., 1997); alcohol and drug use (O'Keeffe et al., 1986; Silverman et al., 2001); and a having a history of aggression (Riggs & O'Leary, 1989, Chase et al., 1998).The one factor that has consistently been associated with being the victim of dating violence, particularly for males, is inflicting dating violence (O'Keefe, 1997).Further, many adolescents have difficulty recognizing physical and sexual abuse as such and may perceive controlling and jealous behaviors as signs of love (Levy, 1990).

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Like bullying, teen dating violence has far-reaching consequences for the health and life outcomes of victims.

We need to do everything we can to make sure all students are safe.” What Is Teen Dating Violence? Associations of dating violence victimization with lifetime participation, co-occurrence, and early initiation of risk behaviors among U.

Teen boys are far more likely to initiate violence and teen girls are more likely to be violent in a case of self-defense. Bureau of Justice statistics reports that over 90% of the reported incidents of assaults in FACT: Teen dating violence can be very dangerous – sometimes lethal.

Males are more likely to report they use violence to intimidate, cause fear, or force their girlfriends into doing something. Results of teen dating violence and sexual assault include serious physical harm, emotional damage, sexually transmitted disease, unwanted pregnancy, and death.

Most obvious is the greater physical harm that can be inflicted by male violence due to males' often greater size and strength.

Compared to boys, girls are more likely to sustain injuries and require medical treatment as a result of the violence (Makepeace, 1987).

There is considerable controversy regarding whether violence in teen dating relationships involves mutual aggression and indeed several studies report higher rates of inflicting violence for females (Foshee, 1996; Gray & Foshee, 1997; O'Keefe, 1997).

Fundamental problems exist, however, in asserting gender parity regarding relationship violence.

One in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship. Some victims provoke the violence committed by their dates by making them jealous, acting mean, or teasing them into thinking they want to have sex.