One in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship. Some victims provoke the violence committed by their dates by making them jealous, acting mean, or teasing them into thinking they want to have sex.

facts on teenage dating and violence-82

Risk factors have been defined as "attributes or characteristics that are associated with an increased probability of [its] reception and/or expression" (Hotaling & Sugarman, 1990 p. Risk factors are correlates of dating violence and not necessarily causative factors.

Thus, they may have implications for prevention program, but they may also be outcomes that have implications for treatment.

Key risk factors consistently found in the literature to be associated with inflicting dating violence include the following: holding norms accepting or justifying the use of violence in dating relationships (Malik et al., 1997; O'Keefe, 1997); having friends in violent relationships (Arriaga & Foshee, 2004); exposure to violence in one's family and community violence (Foo & Margolin, 1995, O'Keefe, 1997; Schwartz et al., 1997); alcohol and drug use (O'Keeffe et al., 1986; Silverman et al., 2001); and a having a history of aggression (Riggs & O'Leary, 1989, Chase et al., 1998).

The one factor that has consistently been associated with being the victim of dating violence, particularly for males, is inflicting dating violence (O'Keefe, 1997).

Given that many of these prevention programs have only been short-term interventions, the results are particularly encouraging and demonstrate a potential to impact public health.

Especially encouraging is a program demonstrating long-term behavioral change.

However, LGBTQ youth are even less likely than heterosexual youth to tell anyone or seek help, and there are fewer resources for these teens.

FACT: There are many reasons youth may stay in abusive relationship: fear, wanting to be loved and needed, having a partner may be important to a youth’s social status, believing the abuser’s apologies and promises to never do it again, peer pressure, loss of self-confidence, not recognizing what’s happening is abusive, and the impact of TV, music, movies and other forms of media that normalize violence.

There is considerable controversy regarding whether violence in teen dating relationships involves mutual aggression and indeed several studies report higher rates of inflicting violence for females (Foshee, 1996; Gray & Foshee, 1997; O'Keefe, 1997).