Less than half of those injured sought healthcare for injuries and less than 3% saw a mental health professional.Study findings suggest the importance of screening and identification of victims of violence.Boys who have faced dating violence are nearly four times as likely to have been bullied online; girls are more than twice as likely.

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Knowledge of physical and mental health effects of violence can guide intervention, prevention, and health promotion strategies.

Future research is needed to describe barriers to seeking healthcare, screening practices of college health programs, and programs to identify victims.

Pediatrician Claire Mc Carthy says she talks about healthy relationships with her adolescent patients and asks if sex is consensual, but she says it is hard for doctors to find time to delve into such intimate issues, given that most pediatric appointments last only 15 minutes.

Doctors might be able to bridge this gap by providing additional information for parents through handouts in the waiting room, she says.

Among those college students that experience an abusive relationship, 70% did not realize at the time they were in an abusive relationship, 60% said no one stepped in to try to help them and 42% kept the abuse private and didn’t tell others about it. Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

Dating abuse ranks dead last on a list of topics parents most commonly discuss with their teens: school/grades (95%), money (90%), the economy (83%), family finances (78%), dating relationships (72%), alcohol (71%), drugs (71%), sex (64%) and dating abuse (31%). 52% of college students know someone in an abusive relationship yet only 8% see it as a major campus problem and many don’t intervene for the following reasons: think it will make the matter worse (62%), feel it is not their business (60%), think it will hurt their relationship with the victim (60%), they know the abuser (56%), and afraid the abuser might make their life more difficult (56%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”. Angela Frederick Amar, Ph D, RN, is Assistant Professor, School of Nursing and Health Studies, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.Susan Gennaro, DSN, RN, FAAN, is Professor, School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. "It has to be taken very seriously."Spinks-Franklin say she has seen violence even among relationships between 10- and 11-year-olds."If a parent is concerned that a child is in an unhealthy relationship, they need to address it, but do it in a way that doesn't make the child shut down," she says."They need to feel safe telling a parent."Teens often hide the abuse from their parents, Spinks-Franklin says.Teens may not be able to confide in friends, either, because abusers sometimes isolate their victims from loved ones.