The rise of the women’s liberation movement, the advent of the sexual revolution, and an increase in women’s labor force participation altered perceptions of gender roles within marriage during the last 50 years.

Cultural norms changed in ways that decreased the aversion to being single and increased the probability of cohabitation.

Men and women who did not complete high school were less likely to marry than were men and women with more education.

Men who earned a bachelor’s degree were more likely to marry than men with less education.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79)—a survey of people born during the 1957–1964 period—this study examines the marriage and divorce patterns for a cohort of young baby boomers up to age 46.

In particular, the study focuses on differences in marriage and divorce patterns by educational attainment and by age at marriage.

When writing a business letter, the layout of your letter is important, so that it will be easy to read and looks professional.

So is your use of an appropriate salutation and closing, your spelling and grammar, and the tone you employ.

This work is descriptive and does not attempt to explain causation or why marriage patterns differ across groups.

About 85 percent of the NLSY79 cohort married by age 46, and among those who married, a sizeable fraction, almost 30 percent, married more than once.

A comparison of the two cohorts shows that the likelihood of marriage declined, the average age at first marriage increased by 1 year, and married couples were more likely to divorce in the latter cohort.

Stevenson and Wolfers found stark differences in marriage patterns between racial groups and between education groups for the 1950–1955 birth cohort: Blacks married later and at lower rates compared with Whites.

It's those weak ties that bring fresh ideas and unexpected opportunities: a job, an apartment, a mate.