In particular, bottles/jars intended for bulky solid food items (like preserved pickles, olives, fruits, etc.) had to have a relatively wide mouth (bore) in order to the facilitate the packing as well as extraction of these products.

(This is evident on the mid-19th century "cathedral" pickle bottle pictured to the above left.) Some liquid food containers like milk bottles (example to the right) also had relatively wide mouths for overall ease of use (and cleaning for re-use) though other more liquid food products (oil, sauces) worked quite well with narrow mouth bottles.

Nicolas Appert who is generally recognized as the father of the canned food industry.

(This was during the Napoleonic War era and was done, not surprisingly, for military reasons.) Appert's experiments with the application of high heat along with the exclusion of air from a sealed container led directly to the development of a canning process in 1809 (and Appert's award of the prize money) that allowed for the relatively long term storage of animal and vegetable products in sealed containers of various materials (Munsey 1970; Roller 1983; Bender 1986; Jones 1993).

Appert's process involved the killing of the bacteria by heating followed by exclusion from further contamination in a sealed container, although the actual scientific reasons as to why the process worked were unknown at the time.

Both of these books have excellent, relatively comprehensive, historical information although both are long out of print and difficult (expensive) to obtain, even on the internet.

: Attached to the "Bottle Types/Diagnostic Shapes" grouping of pages is a complete copy of a never re-printed, 280 page, 1906 Illinois Glass Company bottle catalog scanned at two pages per JPEG file.

Contrary to most other food bottle categories, canning jars have indeed received significant attention from researchers.

The incredible variation in jar brands, and in particular, the hundreds of different closure types, has piqued the interest of collectors and researchers for decades and inspired many authors to approach this category with zeal and research depth (Toulouse 1969; Creswick & Rodrigues 1969; Roller 1983; Creswick 1987; others).

One prominent observer noted that "...bottles made for foods are quite numerous and, in fact, constitute a large portion of bottles made..." (Munsey 1970).

This is likely true in regards to the numbers of items produced which if included with the Medicinal, Chemical & Druggist Bottles types would certainly represent a majority of bottles produced since the early 19th century.

Many solid food bottle/jars also tended to be larger sized bottles since food was (and is) consumed in larger quantities than most other products like medicine or (hopefully) liquor.