The French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution changed the dress code for men and women not only in France.

“Real” trousers and tights increasingly replaced the prevalent use of the hose (clothing) which like stockings covered only the legs and had to be attached with garters to underpants or a doublet.

A skirt-like garment to cover the crotch and bottom was no more necessary.

By the mid-20th century, orthodox Western male dress, especially business and semi-formal dress, was dominated by sober suits, plain shirts and ties.

The connotation of trousers as exclusively male has been lifted by the power of the feminist movement while the connotation of skirts as female is largely still existing leaving the Scottish kilt and the Albanian and Greek fustanella as the only traditional men′s skirts of Europe.

Outside Western cultures, men's clothing commonly includes skirts and skirt-like garments; however, in North America and much of Europe, the wearing of a skirt is today usually seen as typical for women and girls and not men and boys, the most notable exceptions being the cassock and the kilt.

People have variously attempted to promote the wearing of skirts by men in Western culture and to do away with this gender distinction, albeit with limited general success Skirts have been worn since prehistoric times.

The furthest that most men went in the 1960s in this regard were velvet trousers, flowered or frilled shirts and ties, and long hair.

In the 1970s, David Hall, a former research engineer at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), actively promoted the use of skirts for men, appearing on both The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and the Phil Donahue Show.

They were the standard dressing for men and women in all ancient cultures in the Near East and Egypt.

The Kingdom of Sumer in Mesopotamia whose greatest achievement was the invention of writing recorded two categories of clothing.

It covered the straps attaching the upper legs iron cuisse to the breastplate.