This body style was later released as the Fender Telecaster Bass in 1968 after the Precision Bass had been changed in 1957 to make it more closely resemble the Fender Stratocaster guitar.

dating a squier telecaster-13

Fewer than fifty guitars were originally produced under that name, and most were replaced under warranty because of early manufacturing problems.

In particular, the Esquire necks had no truss rod and many were replaced due to bent necks.

In addition, the classic Telecaster neck was fashioned from a single piece of maple without a separate fingerboard, and the frets were slid directly into the side of the maple surface—a highly unorthodox approach in its day (guitars traditionally featured rosewood or ebony fingerboards glued onto mahogany necks).

The electronics were easily accessed for repair or replacement through a removable control plate, a great advantage over the construction of the then-predominant hollow-body instruments, in which the electronics could be accessed only through the soundholes.

In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, screwed to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back.

The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls.

Later in 1950, this single-pickup model was discontinued, and a two-pickup model was renamed the Broadcaster.

From this point onward all Fender necks incorporated truss rods.

Fender did not use the traditional glued-in neck, but rather a "bolt-on" neck (which is actually affixed using screws, not bolts).