By the summer of 1951 the guitar was officially renamed as the Telecaster and has been known as such ever since.

dating a squier telecaster-74

In the period roughly between 19, several craftsmen and companies experimented with solid-body electric guitars, but none had made a significant impact on the market.

Leo Fender's Telecaster was the design that made bolt-on neck, solid body guitars viable in the marketplace.

, is the world's first commercially successful solid-body electric guitar.

Its simple yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in electric guitar manufacturing and popular music.

Since they were manufactured in this form for only a few months very early in the Broadcaster/Telecaster's history, original Nocasters are highly prized and expensive collector's items.

There are no official production numbers, but experts estimate that fewer than 500 Nocasters were produced.

The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later other plastics), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws.

The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each.

Tone had never, until then, been the primary reason for a guitarist to go electric, but in 1943, when Fender and his partner, Clayton Orr "Doc" Kauffman, built a crude wooden guitar as a pickup test rig, local country players started asking to borrow it for gigs. Fender was intrigued, and in 1949, when it was long understood that solid construction offered great advantages in electric instruments, but before any commercial solid-body Spanish guitars had caught on (the then-small Audiovox company apparently offered a modern, solid-body electric guitar as early as the mid-1930s), he built a better prototype.

That hand-built prototype, an anonymous white guitar, had most of the features of what would become the Telecaster.

Fender has since registered Nocaster as a trademark to denote its modern replicas of this famous rarity.