If a woman shows too much interest too soon, she may scare a man away.

If a man keeps calling you, don't start thinking he's a bit of a stalker.

In France and Spain it's not unusual for a man to call/text/email a lot – it just means he's interested.

In Germany, couples don't start with formal dating either and it's only after a series of informal meetings – walks, dinner, cinema, theatre – that they might start being seen as a ‘couple'.

It's also common for couples to keep the fact that they're an item to themselves.

If you're interested in someone, maintain eye contact – if you aren't, don't.

If you say ‘no' to an invitation, he may well think you're playing hard to get and will probably persist.

If you like each other, you'll probably find a way to make it work, regardless of any cultural variations.

But knowing some of the cultural differences – who makes the first move, kissing on a first date, how soon to call after a date – may help you avoid awkward situations, or at least stop you from getting hurt or hurting someone else unintentionally.

After the first date, most people would probably expect to go Dutch (and not just in the Netherlands! Last year, a well-known romantic social networking site asked 13,000 members from around the world ‘Would you kiss on a first date?

' Over half of the Americans, Australians and Canadians said they would kiss on a first date, while only 29 percent of Germans and 32 percent of French said they would pucker up.

In places like the Netherlands and Germany, people can be very direct in the way they speak (rather than being over polite and saying things ‘to be nice' that they don't mean to avoid hurting someone's feelings – as is often the way in the UK).