only a 'professionally trained person can deal adequately with the mass of research'...

In short, the professionals had declared themselves the new arbiters of convention and morality, translators and preachers of their own "science of family living." Sounds like nearly every aspect of American life today.

It should send shivers down the spine of any free-thinking adult.

courtship in america dating in the 20th century-32

Though I liked the thrust of this book (about how the concept of dating arose and how this intersected with new concepts of sexuality), I didn't know what to think of the blanket statement at the beginning that everyone basically engaged with these middle class ideals, no matter their class.

If this is true, this ought to have been a much bigger point (and it ought to have been proven! But, the story nevertheless needed to have been told.

Advice columns answered people worried about women's new roles 'emasculating' men in the 20s; during the depression out of work men felt 'emasculated' by their inability to support their families; Rosie the Riveter 'emasculated' men; women going on dutch dates in the 1950s 'emasculated' men; etcetera ad nauseam.

This is not her main argument so the thread is understated but nevertheless compelling.

There's barely a sentence that isn't footnoted or referenced. And yet, for a 21st century reader, even too much is not enough.

Bailey discusses the impact of indust Published in 1988, this academic look at the evolution of 20th century, white, American courtship takes the reader right up to the advent of the computer age.

This book is a short history that explains what happened and makes a credible stab at why it happened.

I understand the reason it is so popular in university history and women's studies classes: It is interesting, informative, and readable. In addition to journal articles, the author supports her writing with quotations f In the space of about three-quarters of a century, courtship in the United States went through at least three different large-scale changes.

Published in 1988, this academic look at the evolution of 20th century, white, American courtship takes the reader right up to the advent of the computer age.

While Bailey's exhaustive research would have made a fascinating article or interview, I found From Front Porch to Back Seat too long and too dry.

abundance), which gives new meaning to the phrase 'on the market' for a new partner.