A transvaginal ultrasound is usually required to see the baby at this stage of the pregnancy. Although the ultrasound may see your baby, it measures only a few millimetres long, and it is too early to always detect the baby’s heartbeat.You should not be concerned if we cannot see the baby’s heartbeat at this early stage, as this can be normal.However, in the early pregnancy, the developing embryo is very small (at 6 weeks gestation, the baby is only 5-9mm long) and a transvaginal ultrasound may be required to get a better image of the baby.

Sometimes the results of a first trimester scan may be inconclusive or uncertain, and need to be combined with your clinical history and blood tests (serum Bh CG).

Some women need to return for another ultrasound scan a few weeks later to assess the progress of the pregnancy, or they may require another blood test (serial serum Bh CG).

Performing the transvaginal ultrasound usually causes less discomfort than a pap smear. Your privacy will always be respected during your ultrasound, especially the transvaginal examination.

You will have a large towel covering your lower body, in addition to wearing a gown during the transvaginal ultrasound.

The probe is then gently inserted a short distance into the vagina.

All transvaginal probes have been cleaned and sterilised according to recommended protocols.

Pregnancy ultrasounds are performed mainly using transabdominal ultrasound.

For many women, especially after 8 weeks gestation, sufficient information about the baby may be obtained with transabdominal ultrasound only.

We will do our best to answer your questions and minimise your anxiety.